The Alliance for Multispecialty Research (AMR) is a unique network of integrated, geographically diverse, and highly experienced Clinical Research Centers of Excellence. Chartered as a formal organization in 1994, AMR Centers of Excellence provide clinical trial services across a broad base of therapeutic areas to the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, nutrition and medical device industries.
To learn more about AMR’s fully integrated network, click here: amrllc.com.

Volunteers

When you volunteer to participate in a clinical research trial, you do more than just give of your time … you contribute to the development of medical therapies that could one day improve the health and quality of life of millions of people. At CKRA, we value the safety, comfort and well-being of our patients above all else, and we hope your experience as a research volunteer is both educational and enjoyable.

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Current Studies

Becoming a Study Volunteer – FAQs

  • Can a participant leave a clinical trial after it has begun? Yes. A participant can leave a clinical trial, at any time. When withdrawing from the trial, the participant should let the research team know about it, and the reasons for leaving the study.
  • Does a participant continue to work with a primary health care provider while in a trial? Yes. Most clinical trials provide short-term treatments related to a designated illness or condition, but do not provide extended or complete primary health care. In addition, by having the health care provider work with the research team, the participant can ensure that other medications or treatments will not conflict with the protocol.
  • How is the safety of the participant protected? The ethical and legal codes that govern medical practice also apply to clinical trials. In addition, most clinical research is federally regulated with built in safeguards to protect the participants. The trial follows a carefully controlled protocol, a study plan which details what researchers will do in the study. As a clinical trial progresses, researchers ...
  • What are side effects and adverse reactions? Any research study involves some risk because some of the side effects of the experimental drug or therapy under investigation are unknown. While side effects can be negative or positive, an adverse reaction is a negative side effect directly related to the drug. Examples include headache, nausea, skin irritation or other physical problems that may ...
  • What are the benefits and risks of participating in a clinical trial? Clinical trials that are well-designed and well-executed are the best approach for eligible participants to: Play an active role in their own health care. Gain access to new research treatments before they are widely available. Help others by contributing to medical research. There are also risks to clinical trials: There may be unpleasant, serious or even life-threatening side effects to ...
  • What are the different types of clinical trials? Treatment trials test new treatments, new combinations of drugs, or new approaches to surgery or radiation therapy. Prevention trials look for better ways to prevent disease in people who have never had the disease or to prevent a disease from returning. These approaches may include medicines, vitamins, vaccines, minerals, or lifestyle changes. Diagnostic trials are conducted to ...
  • What are the phases of clinical trials? Clinical trials are conducted in phases. The trials at each phase have a different purpose and help scientists answer different questions: In Phase I trials, researchers test a new drug or treatment in a small group of people (20-80) for the first time to evaluate its safety, determine a safe dosage range, and identify side effects. In ...
  • What happens during a clinical trial? What happens during a clinical trial? The clinical trial process depends on the kind of trial being conducted (See What are the different types of clinical trials?) The clinical trial team includes doctors and nurses as well as social workers and other health care professionals. They check the health of the participant at the beginning of ...
  • What is a clinical trial? A clinical trial (also called clinical research) is a research study in human volunteers to answer specific health questions. Carefully conducted clinical trials are the fastest and safest way to find treatments that work in people and ways to improve health. Interventional trials determine whether experimental treatments or new ways of using known therapies are ...
  • What is a control or control group? A control is the standard by which experimental observations are evaluated. In many clinical trials, one group of patients will be given an experimental drug or treatment, while the control group is given either a standard treatment for the illness or a placebo.
  • What is a Placebo? A placebo is an inactive pill, liquid, or powder that has no treatment value. In clinical trials, experimental treatments are often compared with placebos to assess the treatment’s effectiveness. In some studies, the participants in the control group will receive a placebo instead of an active drug or treatment.
  • What is a protocol? A protocol is a study plan on which all clinical trials are based. The plan is carefully designed to safeguard the health of the participants as well as answer specific research questions. A protocol describes what types of people may participate in the trial; the schedule of tests, procedures, medications, and dosages; and the length ...
  • What is informed consent? What is informed consent? Informed consent is the process of learning the key facts about a clinical trial before deciding whether or not to participate. It is also a continuing process throughout the study to provide information for participants. To help someone decide whether or not to participate, the doctors and nurses involved in the trial ...
  • What kind of preparation should a potential participant make for the meeting with the research coordinator or doctor? Plan ahead and write down possible questions to ask. Ask a friend or relative to come along for support and to hear the responses to the questions. Bring a tape recorder to record the discussion to replay later. Every clinical trial in the U.S. must be approved and monitored by an Institutional Review Board (IRB) to make sure the ...
  • What should people consider before participating in a trial? People should know as much as possible about the clinical trial and feel comfortable asking the members of the health care team questions about it, the care expected while in a trial, and the cost of the trial. The following questions might be helpful for the participant to discuss with the health care team. Some ...
  • Where do the ideas for trials come from? Ideas for clinical trials usually come from researchers. After researchers test new therapies or procedures in the laboratory and in animal studies, the treatments with the most promising laboratory results are moved into clinical trials. During a trial, more and more information is gained about a new treatment, its risks and how well it may ...
  • Who can participate in a clinical trial? All clinical trials have guidelines about who can participate. Using inclusion/exclusion criteria is an important principle of medical research that helps to produce reliable results. The factors that allow someone to participate in a clinical trial are called “inclusion criteria” and those that disallow someone from participating are called “exclusion criteria”. These criteria are based ...
  • Who sponsors clinical trials? Clinical trials are sponsored or funded by a variety of organizations or individuals such as physicians, medical institutions, foundations, voluntary groups, and pharmaceutical companies, in addition to federal agencies such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Department of Defense (DOD), and the Department of Veteran’s Affairs (VA). Trials can take place in a ...
  • Why participate in a clinical trial? Participants in clinical trials can play a more active role in their own health care, gain access to new research treatments before they are widely available, and help others by contributing to medical research.

  • (Studies listed above, High Blood Pressure, Vaccine Studies, Diabetes, High Cholesterol, etc.)
  • In order to better match you with the appropriate study, we would like to know a little more about your overall medical health and history. Please provide as much information as you can in the following fields. Per CKRA’s privacy policy, all of your personal information that we have obtained will be kept in our secure database, which can only be accessed by authorized CKRA personnel, unless given your permission or except as required by law.

  • (Medical Conditions, Diagnosis, Surgeries, Illnesses, Allergies, etc.)
  • (Prescribed, Over-the-Counter, Herbs, etc.)